History (HIST)

HIST-306  International Relations    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
A study of the central issues and problems in the history of modern international relations. This course will explore such issues as the connection between the First World War and the Second World War, the impact of the policies of great powers on conflicts in the non-western world, and the causes and consequences of the Cold War. This course will also examine the rise of international organization, the expansion of Western power, and the acceleration of global interdependence.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-308  America and the World    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: As needed
A study of the central issues and problems in the history of America’s relations with the larger world. This course will examine such topics as American independence and expansion, the Civil War and the “new empire”, the Spanish-American War, American involvement in the First World War, U.S. foreign relations in the interwar period, American involvement in the Second World War in the Pacific and Europe, The Cold War, the impact of the U.S. in Latin America, Asia and Africa, and American foreign relations since 1989.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-310  Imperialism    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
A broad comparative study of the central issues and the problems in the history of modern imperialism. This course will encompass historical writing, novels, poetry, film, and primary documents to examine such themes as the meaning of “imperialism;” colonial rule and administration; the technology and economics of empire; the tensions between cultural diversity and political unity; the impact of imperialism on art, architecture and society; decolonization; and the legacies of imperialism for contemporary Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-312  History of Science    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: As needed
Topics, figures, and ideas in the history of science will be explored. Attention is paid to transitions between patterns of scientific thinking; the social, political, and religious dimensions of scientific theory and practice; the relationship between science and technology; and the impact of modern science on understandings of human purpose and identity. Social Science Credit.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-316  History of the Atlantic World    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: As needed
The creation and development of the Atlantic world from the sixteenth to the twentieth century will be examined. Transcending the constraints of national histories and modern state boundaries, the course explores the connections among the various parts of the Atlantic intercontinental world and the important historical forces and processes that transformed it. Through investigations of the experiences of four continents, this course traces the evolution of new institutions in the Americas; addresses issues of ethnic, racial, and religious differences and interactions; and attempts to provide new framework for understanding human diversity.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-320  Modern Middle East    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: As needed
The history of the Middle East from World War I to the Gulf War of 1991 will be surveyed. It focuses on the Arabic-speaking areas of the former Ottoman empire, Turkey, Iran, and Israel. Thematically, the course explores major themes in Middle East history; the rise of nationalism and formation of nation-states; economic development strategies of the new states and formation of new social classes; the impact of Israeli and Palestinian nationalism and conflicts; oil and politics; the Islamic Revolution in Iran, and the Gulf War. The course also examines the impact of outside powers on the region; problems of political, economic, and cultural decolonization; and efforts to reassert Islamic identity in an era of tightening globalization. Considerable attention will be devoted to the region since 1945 and to the problems and promises of the present day.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-322  Africa in the World Economy    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Terms Offered: As needed
Africa’s involvement in the changing world economy and its role in the contemporary world will be examined. Its goal is to provide students a framework for understanding Africa’s contemporary economic challenges and opportunities. The course begins by examining the political, social and economic history of the continent since independence, focusing on how the lack of visible material and social progress in the post-independence period framed popular perceptions about Africa. The role of external players and ideas and the nature of local initiatives and responses in shaping Africa’s place in the world economy will also be examined.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-391  History Special Topics    4 Credits

Prerequisites: HUMN-201 and SSCI-201
Terms Offered: As needed
An interdisciplinary advanced course focusing on a specific topic. This course is a one-time offering whose content is determined by current faculty interest, and provides a comprehensive and coherent examination of the chosen topic. This course may be repeated for credit under different topic
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

HIST-499  History Independent Study    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Term Offered: As needed
History Independent Study course. See Dept. Head for prerequisites. This course facilitates depth and breadth of study in a particular area of History. This course may not serve as a substitute for any of the courses in the general education component, including the Social Science elective and senior seminar. Students must request and receive approval of the independent study topic with the instructor. The form stating the independent study name, credit hours, description and approval must reach the Registrar's office, no later than Wednesday, first week.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0