Electrical Engineering (EE)

EE-210  Circuits I    3 Credits

Corequisites: EE-211
Prerequisites: PHYS-224 and PHYS-225 and (MATH-102 or MATH-102H or MATH-102X)
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
Fundamental DC and AC circuit analysis techniques are covered in this introductory course. Topics include circuit variables and elements; resistors, inductors, and capacitors; and sinusoidal steady-state analysis with power calculations. Laboratory experience is designed to re-enforce the fundamental analysis techniques discussed in class.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-211  Circuits I Lab    1 Credits

Corequisites: EE-210
Prerequisites: None
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
An introductory laboratory course designed to reinforce the fundamental analysis techniques discussed in EE-210, Circuits I. Topics include: safe use of laboratory equipment and experimental verification of analysis techniques.
Lecture: 0, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-212  Applied Electrical Circuits    3 Credits

Corequisites: MATH-204, MECH-231L
Prerequisites: PHYS-224 and PHYS-225
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
Application of electrical circuit components are covered in this course. Topics include: Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s laws; series and parallel circuits; voltage and current division rules; node-voltage and mesh-current methods; superposition; Thevenin’s, and Norton’s theorems; first- and second-order R-L-C circuits; steady-state analysis and power calculations for sinusoidally-varying (ac) sources; operational amplifiers; and diodes. This course will not satisfy the requirements of an Electrical or Computer Engineering degree.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

EE-240  Electromagnetic Fields and Applications    4 Credits

Prerequisites: PHYS-224 and PHYS-225
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
Basics of electromagnetic fields and applications are studied. Topics include: vector analysis; gradient, divergence, and curl; electrostatic fields; electrostatic boundary-value problems; magnetostatic fields; magnetic circuits; and Maxwell’s equations for time-varying fields.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-310  Circuits II    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-210 and (MATH-204 or MATH-204H)
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
A second course in circuit analysis. Topics include: first-order and second-order transient circuit analysis, the Fourier series, three-phase circuits, resonance, filters, Bode plots and magnetically coupled circuits.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-320  Electronics I    3 Credits

Corequisites: EE-321
Prerequisites: EE-210 and EE-211
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
The basic building blocks used in electronic engineering are studied. Topics include: operational amplifiers; diodes; MOS and bipolar devices; basic transistor amplifier configurations; and MOSFET digital logic circuits.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-321  Electronics I Laboratory    1 Credits

Corequisites: EE-320
Prerequisites: EE-210 and EE-211
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
An introductory laboratory course designed to reinforce the topics in EE-320, Electronics I. Experiments include: PSPICE simulation, operational amplifiers; diodes; MOS and bipolar transistor configurations; MOSFET digital circuits.
Lecture: 0, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-322  Applied Power Electronics    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-212 and MECH-231L
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Basics of power electronic circuits and applications are studied. Topics include operational amplifiers; diodes; bipolar-junction transistors; metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors; insulated-gate bipolar-junction transistors; thyristors; 555-timer; controlled rectifiers; chopper circuits; inverters; and voltage controllers. Emphasis will be placed upon fuel cell related applications. This course will not satisfy the requirements of an Electrical or Computer Engineering degree.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-325  Principles of Microelectronics Processing    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-320 and EE-321
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
The principles of semiconductor processing for modern integrated circuits are covered in this introductory course. Topics include a brief review of semiconductor devices and semiconductor circuit families, modern CMOS technology and process flow, crystal growth, semiconductor processing, thin film deposition oxidation, etching, lithography and an introduction to clean room principles. Principles of manufacturing process control and modeling for manufacturability will be presented. Computed simulation will be extensively used where appropriate.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-336  Continuous-Time Signals and Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: (MATH-204 or MATH-204H) and EE-210
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Introductory continuous-time signals and systems are studied. Topics include: definitions and properties of signals and systems, convolution, differential equations, Laplace transform with applications, Fourier series, and Fourier transform of continuous-time signals with applications.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-338  Discrete-Time Signals and Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: (MATH-204 or MATH-204H) and EE-210
Minimum Class Standing: Sophomore
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Introductory discrete-time signals and systems are studied. Topics include: definitions and properties of signals and systems, sampling, convolution, difference equations, Z transform with applications, and the Fourier transform of discrete-time signals with applications.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-340  Electromagnetic Wave Propagation    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-240
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Advanced concepts of electromagnetic fields are studied. Topics include: propagation of uniform plane waves in various material media; transmission line analysis; electromagnetic wave propagation in waveguides; and antennas.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-342  Electrical Machines    4 Credits

Corequisites: EE-310
Prerequisites: EE-210 and EE-211 and EE-240
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Operating principles and design concepts of various types of electrical machines are studied. Topics include: magnetic circuits, single-phase and three-phase transformers; dc motors and generators; three-phase alternators; synchronous motors, induction motors and single-phase motors.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-344  Fundamentals of Power Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-210 and EE-211
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Basic structure of electrical power systems and characteristics of power transmission lines, transformers and generators are studied. Topics include: representation of power systems; symmetrical three-phase fault analysis; symmetrical components; unsymmetrical fault computations; and network analyzers.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-346  High Voltage Generation and Measurement Techniques    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-210 and EE-211 and EE-240
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Insulation overvoltage-tests are studied. Topics include: generation of high, direct, alternating, and impulse voltages; voltage multiplier circuits; resonant test circuits; resistive, capacitive and mixed high-voltage dividers; sphere gaps; electrostatic voltmeters, Kerr Cell; and electrostatic coupling, interference, and grounding and safety.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-348  Electromagnetic Compatibility    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-210 and EE-240
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Issues involved in designing electrical and electronic systems to achieve electromagnetic compatibility are studied. Topics include: interference sources; government regulations limiting conducted and radiated omissions; electric and magnetic field noise coupling; grounding; filtering; shielding; electrostatic discharge; spectral analysis of electromagnetic interference; design methods for minimizing radiated emissions from digital circuits; and measurements of system emissions and susceptibility.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-391  EE Special Topics    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-420  Electronics II    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-310 and EE-320 and EE-321
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Advanced concepts of electronic engineering are studied. Topics include: nonlinear circuits; active filters; differential and multistage amplifiers; pulse and switching circuits; integrated circuits; and electronic system design.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-424  Power Electronics and Applications    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-310 and EE-320 and EE-321
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Speed control and dynamic representation of electric motors are studied. Topics include: characteristics of iodes; diacs; thyristors; and MOSFET’s; thyristor gate firing circuits; operating principles of AC/DC, DC/DC and DC/AC converter circuits; and computer-aided state-space analysis of the dynamic response of the converter circuits.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-427  Semiconductor Device Fundamentals    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-320
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Basic semiconductor theory for solid-state devices, diode theory, and applications of theory for transistors are studied. Topics include: energy bands, carrier statistics, equilibrium carrier concentrations, carrier transport, electrostatic devices, diode I-V characteristics, optical device applications, microwave device effects, and BJT, JFET, MESFET and MOSFET transistor models. Note: A student cannot receive credit for both EE-426 and EE-427.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-430  Communication Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-310 and EE-320 and MATH-408 and (EE-336 or EE-338)
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
The study of methods used in electronic communication systems. Topics include: Fourier Transforms; analysis of distortion over a communication channel; autocorrelation of deterministic and random signals; energy and power spectral density; amplitude modulation; frequency modulation; phase modulation; digital line coding and modulation; communication circuitry.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-432  Feedback Control Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-310 and EE-320 and EE-321 and EE-336
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Time and frequency domain representations of control systems are studied. Topics include: stability criteria; root locus methods; frequency response techniques, s-plane design methods. Design and evaluation of control systems are supplemented with computer aided control system design software.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-434  Digital Signal Processing    4 Credits

Prerequisites: ECE-101 and EE-338
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Basic principles, design and applications of digital signal processing systems are presented. Topics include: review of discrete-time signals and systems, the z-transform, discrete-time Fourier analysis, the Discrete Fourier Transform, the Fast Fourier Transform, digital filter structures, FIR filters, and IIR filters. This course includes extensive use of MATLAB and experimental design projects using real-time signal processors.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-444  Computational Methods in Power Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-344
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Matrix analysis of power system networks is studied. Topics include: power flow study of large scale interconnected power systems using Gauss-Seidel and Newton-Raphson methods; computer-aided short circuit analysis of large systems; economic operation of power networks; transient stability analysis; overvoltage calculations; and fundamentals of power system protection.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-490  Senior Electrical Engineering Design Project    4 Credits

Prerequisites: CE-320 and EE-240 and EE-310 and EE-320 and EE-321 and EE-336 and EE-338
Minimum Class Standing: Senior
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Students will design, implement, document, and present a device or system as a significant capstone project. The project will emphasize electrical engineering, but will be multidisciplinary.
Lecture: 2, Lab 4, Other 0

EE-524  Fuel Cell System Integration and Packaging    4 Credits

Prerequisites: (EE-322 or EE-424) and MECH-420
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
The conversion, management, and control of electric power produced by 10kW-200kW fuel cells for both mobile and stationary applications is the focus of this course. Special considerations will be given to packaging of fuel cells and motor drive circuits, thermal management and heat dissipation, bi-directional energy flow through the electric machines and motor drives, ultracapacitor technology, NiMH batteries, and control of high power motors. Emphasis includes design and packaging of high temperature motor drives for processing power generated by fuel cells and for conditioning power generated by these same electric motors during regenerative braking. Technical issues that are addressed include: control of the motor drives; heat removal from the fuel cell, motor drive semiconductor switches and magnetics; behavior of power semiconductor switches at elevated temperature; thermal design and analysis of the electronics package; noise generation in control systems by electric power transients and modeling of the power system. This course is presented from the perspective of the systems engineers that are responsible for the overall system design and integration of the power electronics, the fuel cell, the heat removal technology, and the electric machines to make a system that has an acceptable lifetime in a hostile thermal environment.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

EE-526  Advanced Power Electronics    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
Course work or work experience in power electronics or electric vehicle drive trains is a prerequisite for this course. An advanced class in power electronics providing state variable modeling of DC-DC converters. Topics include: buck, boost/buck-boost/Cuk; state variable modeling of converter topologies: floating interleaved dual boost, floating double-interleaved dual boost, floating double boost double stage boost, and isolated full lH-bridge; converter control system design based on state variable models; circuits for soft switching in inverters and converters; single phase inverter design; three phase, six-step inverter design; multilevel inverter design; Pulse Width Modulation (PWM): SPWM, HEPWM, SVPWM; resonant converters: series, parallel, series-parallel; wireless battery charging.
Lecture: 4, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-528  Power Semiconductors    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring
Course work or work experience in power electronics or electric vehicle drive trains is a prerequisite for this course. The study of power semiconductors is covered in this course. Topics include: semiconductor physics review; diffusion and drift currents; reverse recovery of diodes; principles of operation of semiconductor power switches; snubbers and diode protection and isolated gate drive circuits for MOSFETs and IGBTs; static and dynamic power losses in power switch turn-on and turn-off; equivalent circuit models for IGBTs; effects of temperature on electrical operation of power switches; semiconductor switch cooling methods and electrical representation of steady state and transient cooling models of power semiconductors; advanced semiconductor power switches: SiC and GaN; reliability models of power semiconductors: thermal cycling/thermal expansion/failure modes; commercial semiconductor power modules and devices.
Lecture: 4, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-530  Digital Control Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: EE-432
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Control of continuous-time processes using computer-based controllers is studied. Topics include: design of control algorithms for implementation on digital computers; modeling of discrete-time systems; application of z-transforms; stability analysis; root locus analysis; controller design via conventional techniques; state-space analysis and modeling; and design of control systems using state-space methods. Implementation of real-time digital controllers is performed in the lab.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

EE-582  Robot Dynamics and Control    4 Credits

Corequisites: EE-432
Prerequisites: None
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
Principles of robot analysis, design, and operation are presented. Topics include: coordinate systems, kinematics and robot dynamics; feedback, feedforward, and adaptive methods for arm control; vision and intelligence; and mobile robots.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0