Academic Policies and Regulations

All faculty and students are urged to review and understand the University’s Academic Policies and Regulations. This section is intended as a convenient reference for faculty, staff and students. It also serves as a description of the student’s academic rights and responsibilities and as a guarantee of equitable treatment for all students. Some sections may reference other sections of the catalog, when necessary. Each section also concludes with the name of the official or office to contact with questions.

Academic Advising

Academic advising represents a shared relationship between the student and his/her academic advisor and a process of continuous improvement, clarification and evaluation with the aim of assisting the student in achieving his/her goals. Each academic department has established its own system for facilitating advising processes as well as a representative academic program. In addition to following the representative program, students are encouraged to communicate regularly with an academic advisor to discuss academic matters, to determine progress toward degree completion, and to ensure that prerequisites have been satisfied and other departmental requirements have been met.

Questions: Contact the degree/program department

Academic Standing

Provisional Admission

Provisional Admission is a temporary status, which allows students to demonstrate their readiness for graduate work.  A graduate student who has been granted provisional admission will be granted full admission after completion of their first two courses with a grade of 3.0 or better.  Failure to complete the first two courses with a grade of 3.0 or better may result in dismissal from the program.

The criteria for provisional admission is uniquely determined by the departmental admission committee, and in some cases collateral work may be required from the applicant to confirm their readiness for a specific program.

Probation

A graduate student whose cumulative grade point average falls below a 3.0 is automatically placed on academic probation. Probationary status is removed only when a graduate student’s cumulative GPA equals or exceeds the minimum of 3.0 required to earn a Master’s degree.

A graduate student who remains on probation after completing 12 credit hours since being placed on probation may be dismissed from the program. A probationary student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.5 will automatically be dismissed from the graduate program. Such dismissals may be appealed to the Graduate Council. Advisement regarding the appeal process to return after academic dismissal is provided through the Graduate School.

Separation

A student may be separated from the University if he/she fails to demonstrate progress toward the degree by successfully completing a class within any consecutive two year period.

Appeal Process to Return after Academic Dismissal

After the academic dismissal process, students may appeal to the Graduate Academic Review Committee for readmission by submitting a letter of appeal to the Graduate Council via the Graduate School one term prior to the term in which they are seeking re-admittance.

This letter of appeal for re-admittance must state the cause(s) of the student’s academic problems, changes in the student’s situation that may rectify those problems and a proposed plan of action to ensure success in the Graduate School. Students are readmitted on a probationary status for one term.

Decisions of the Graduate Council are final.

Questions: Contact the Graduate School at gsr@kettering.edu 

Disability Services

Kettering University provides disability services in compliance with the American with Disabilities Act (1990) and its amendments, along with state and local regulations regarding students, employees, and applicants with disabilities. Under these laws, no qualified individual with a disability shall be denied access to participation in services, programs, and/or activities at Kettering University.  In carrying out Kettering‘s policy regarding disabled students, employees and applicants, we recognize mobility, sensory, medical, psychological, and learning disabilities.  We attempt to provide reasonable accommodations for these disabilities for all students who meet the criteria described in the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Any Kettering student who has been diagnosed with a physical, medical, psychological, or learning disability, or suspects that s/he may have one, must contact the Wellness Center.  The staff will evaluate the required documentation in support of the claim of disability and make an assessment of a student‘s needs on a case-by-case basis.  The Wellness Center will then determine the appropriate services and accommodations necessary to meet the legal requirements as required by law.  The Center will inform faculty and staff who may be responsible for providing the services and/or accommodations.  Each term, students must meet with each professor to arrange individual accommodations.

Prospective students in the admissions process should contact the Wellness Center as soon as possible to discuss appropriate documentation needed to verify a disability and to identify the type of services, accommodations, and adaptive equipment that may be necessary. 

Testing Accommodations

The Academic Success Center (ASC) provides an alternative testing environment for students who are approved by faculty to take make-up tests or who receive testing accommodations. Testing accommodations allow students to get extended test time, individual testing space, and/or readers/scribes. The individual testing accommodations provided by ASC are approved and strictly dictated by the Wellness Center.

Active Status

Students are expected to enroll in their first class within a year of their acceptance term.  Students who do not enroll within that year will have their enrollment status changed to “inactive”.  As a consequence, the student may need to reapply to the degree program.

Note: Students may also have their status changed to “inactive” if there is a lapse in course enrollment for more than two years.  If inactivated, the student will need to contact the registrar’s office to apply for readmission to the degree program.

Last Known Date of Attendance Reporting:

Kettering University does not require faculty to take attendance. The U.S. Department of Education requires the Financial Aid Office to differentiate students who fail a class because they quit attending from those who fail a class based on merit. Because a student could be a financial aid applicant at any point during the academic year, this information must be collected on all students, so that financial aid eligibility can be accurately determined.

The Last Known Date of Attendance Reporting Policy is necessary to appropriately assess the financial liability for students, ensure good stewardship of financial aid funds, and limit the financial liability for the university and academic consequences for the student. The amount of funds earned by a student is based on the amount of time spent in attendance by the student for that term. In addition, this information is often useful in arbitrating cases when students believe they completed the process to drop or withdraw from a course.

After the drop/add period each term, a ‘last date of attendance’ notification, or ‘never attended’ notification by a faculty member will result in the automatic assignment of either a WN (withdrawal for non-attendance) grade or an FN (failure for non-attendance) grade by the Registrar’s Office. This initiates re-evaluation of a student’s financial aid and it will be adjusted for those classes.

Student Responsibility

Students are expected to attend all the sessions of the classes in which they are enrolled. Students who stop attending classes should immediately withdraw from those course(s) prior to the course withdrawal deadline specified on the academic calendar. Students who do not officially withdraw from a course they are not attending may be reported by their instructor as having a last date of attendance. When this happens, the student will remain responsible for any financial liability, less applicable refunds they have incurred associated with the last date of attendance reported, and for any academic consequences associated with the last date of attendance reported and the assignment of the WN or FN grade.

School Responsibility

After the drop/add period each term, a last date of attendance reporting by a faculty member will result in that automatic assignment of either a grade of WN (withdrawal for non-attendance) or FN (failure for non-attendance) by the Registrar’s Office as follows:

  • A grade of WN (withdrawal for non-attendance) is issued if the last known date of attendance is within the course withdrawal period specified on the academic calendar. A WN grade is treated the same as a W (withdrawal) grade in that it will not affect a student’s term or overall GPA.
  • A grade of FN (failure for non-attendance) is issued if the last known date of attendance is after the course withdrawal period specified on the academic calendar. An FN grade is treated the same as a failing grade in that it will be included in a students’ term and overall GPA.
  • Once a faculty member has reported a last date of attendance, the student will no longer be able to attend or participate in the class.

Class Attendance Policy Related to Required Military Duty or Veteran Status

Questions on whether an activity is a required military service activity for purposes of this policy should be directed to the Associate Provost. If anticipated absences for a term appear to be extraordinarily numerous or difficult to accommodate, a faculty member may appeal the need for the full accommodation to the Associate Provost.

Absences due to military duty or veteran status must be excused. This includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Mandatory monthly drill instruction, such as duty completed by national guard members and military reservists (typically this involves a one-day absence in order to extend weekend training).
  • Service-related medical appointments where failure to appear might result in a loss of benefits.

Students must give written notice to the faculty member at least one week in advance of the absence unless last-minute schedule changes make this notice impossible. Students are strongly encouraged to inform each faculty member of their known and anticipated absences as far in advance as possible, preferably at the start of the term.

The faculty shall accord students the opportunity to independently make up coursework or work of equal value, for the day(s) the event was scheduled and to take a scheduled exam at an alternate time. The faculty member shall determine alternate exam times and due dates for missed course work. These assigned dates may be prior to the date of the absence.

Students are still responsible for demonstrating achievement of course learning goals, even when absences due to military duty are necessary and reasonable. In situations with many absences or extended periods of military duty (e.g. being called to active duty), it may be most appropriate for the student to withdraw and retake the course in a future term.

Auditing a Course

Occasionally, a student may wish to attend a course without earning credit (for example, to refresh course knowledge).  This arrangement is called ‘auditing’ a course.  Audited courses are listed on a transcript with the grade AU (audit) and no credits earned.  Audited courses incur regular tuition fees; however, audits are not considered part of a course load for academic or financial aid purposes, which means that students cannot count audited credits toward a full-time student status, or receive financial aid for an audited class.

A student needs the course instructor’s permission to audit a course.  Students who want to audit a course must complete a Request to Audit Course Form, have it signed by the course instructor, and submit it to the Office of the Registrar during the drop/add period specified on the academic calendar.  Audits cannot be charged to a regular enrollment after the drop/add period noted on the academic calendar.

Students who choose an audit option are expected to attend the audited class and complete all course requirements (with the exclusion of the tests).  If the students do not meet attendance requirements for the course, they earn the grade of WN (withdrawn for non-attendance).  Once a WN grade is issued, the student may no longer attend or participate in the class.  AU and WN grades do not affect the term and cumulative grade point averages.

Auditing of Online courses offered through Kettering University Online is not allowed.

Bachelor/Master Program

This option is available only to Kettering University undergraduate students entering the MBA, Operations Management, Engineering or Engineering Management graduate programs.

Kettering University undergraduate students who desire to obtain a master’s degree may elect to apply to the Bachelor/Master Program which provides students an opportunity to accelerate the process in which they earn both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree. This program is only available to Kettering University undergraduate students and leverages Kettering University’s premier academic programs. Students who are admitted into the Bachelor/Master Program will complete the same total number of Co-op work terms as conventional non-Bachelor/Master undergraduate students.

Option 1: Undergraduate (BBA/BS) Thesis

  • Students must apply before graduating (after completing 120 credit hours) or within six (6) years after obtaining their undergraduate degree.
  • The student completes the undergraduate degree, with the traditional undergraduate thesis (BS), and received the bachelor’s degree at the conventional time.
  • Up to eight (8) credits of 500-level courses, completed at the undergraduate level, and for which a grade of B or better was earned, are also applied to the master’s degree. (Mechanical Engineering capstone courses do not apply.)
  • Forty (40) credits remain to complete the MBA (total of 48 graduate credits) or thirty-two (32) credits remain to complete the master of science degree (total of 40 graduate credits). As an option, four (4) of these credits can be granted for an MS thesis.

Option 2: Graduate Thesis Only: No Undergraduate Thesis

  • Students must apply before starting their undergraduate thesis (i.e., before submitting their PTA).
  • Eight (8) credits granted for the graduate-level thesis, four are applied to the undergraduate degree and four are applied to the graduate degree.
  • The student will not receive the bachelor’s degree until completion of the graduate-level thesis.
  • Up to eight (8) credits of 500-level courses, which were completed at the undergraduate level,  and for which a grade of B or better was earned, are also applied to the master’s degree.
  • One course (four credits) will be waived in the graduate program.
  • Twenty-eight (28) credits remain to complete the master’s degree (a total of 36 graduate credits).
  • The MS thesis will be a more purely academic thesis driven by the faculty, but must be authorized by the student sponsor.

Grade Requirements for Program Admission

A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required. Students with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered on an individual basis. The degree granting department will determine acceptance.

Other Requirements

  • Both part-time and full-time MBA and MS students may qualify for this program.
  • This program is only available to students who will receive (or have received) a Kettering University bachelor’s degree.

Questions:

  • For MS Engineering options, please contact Dr. Bassem Ramadan at 810-762-9928 or bramadan@kettering.edu
  • For the MBA option, please contact the School of Management at som@kettering.edu

Concentrations

A concentration is a specialized area of study within a major area of study. Concentrations appear on a student’s transcript at student declaration, and requirements must be completed at the time of graduation. A concentration is not required for all majors for graduation. A student wishing to declare a concentration must notify the Office of the Registrar to have it added to their record.

Question: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Curriculum Restrictions

A student may take no more than four (4) courses numbered below 600-level to count toward their Master’s degree.

Questions: Contact the Program Advisor

E-mail: Notification/Obligation to Read

All students have the privilege of having a Kettering University Google Apps e-mail account. The Kettering e-mail account is one of the official ways Kettering University faculty and staff communicate to students. Students are responsible for required actions conveyed to them through this communication vehicle, whether or not they read the message.

Kettering provides each student with unlimited e-mail server storage. Therefore, we strongly recommend that students do not auto forward to another e-mail service provider which may have less storage capacity, fewer features, and may hinder you to reply directly to the original email source.

Due to the proliferation of spam and phishing emails, be advised that you may receive emails that may request personal information such as usernames and passwords. Although it may look authentic, pretending to originate from a legitimate source such as Kettering, do not respond. Immediately delete it recognizing that a legitimate source such as the Kettering IT department would never ask you to provide information such as passwords. Be cautious regarding any unsolicited email as it may contain elements that would prove to be detrimental to your computer.

Questions: Contact Information Technology

Enrollment Status/Verifications

Enrollment Verifications may be obtained through the Office of the Registrar.  Enrollment verifications confirm a student’s enrollment status (full-time, half-time, less than half-time) and expected graduation date.  Listed below are the graduate level enrollment statuses at Kettering University:

Enrollment Status

8 or more credits or THS1 or THS2 = Full Time
4-7 credits = Half Time
1-3 credits or THS3 = Less Than Half Time

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Grades

Course grades are available after each term via Banner Web. Federal law prohibits communication of grades by telephone. Students may access their grade report and/or print a grade report to provide to their company by logging on to Banner Web.

Grade Description Points
A Outstanding 4.0
A- Outstanding 3.7
B+ Satisfactory 3.3
B Satisfactory 3.0
B- Satisfactory 2.7
C+ Less than satisfactory 2.3
C Less than satisfactory 2.0
C- Less than satisfactory 1.7
F Fail 0.0
AU Audit 0.0
CR Credit 0.0
FN Failure for non-attendance 0.0
I Incomplete 0.0
W Withdrawal 0.0
WN Withdrawn for non-attendance 0.0

Course Hours and Points Definitions

Quality Points = Grade x Credit Hours
GPA = Quality Points ÷ GPA Hours

Attempted hours (AHRS) – are the sum of the course credit hours for which a student has registered. Attempted hours per term is the basis for determining tuition charges and a measure of the student load.

Earned hours (EHRS) – represent work equivalent to that defined for a University credit hour that the student has successfully completed at Kettering University, at another university or by examination. Not all earned hours necessarily apply to the specific degree program being pursued by the student.

Grade Point Average (GPA) – is computed for each term individually and cumulatively. In either case, the weighted GPA is computed by dividing the total quality points earned by the total quality hours accumulated.

GPA hours (GPA-HRS) – are equal to the credit hour value of the course and are awarded only for course work taken at Kettering University. Only course work resulting in GPA hours is used in computing a student’s grade point average (GPA).

Quality Points (QPTS) – are a computational value used to compute a student’s grade point average (GPA). The quality points earned for a given course are equal to the credit hour value of the course multiplied by the numerical equivalent of the letter grade.

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Credit Hour Policy 

Kettering University defines a credit hour as one 60-minute class period per week. The University assigns four [4] credits to all courses in all undergraduate and graduate degree programs: on-ground and Kettering University Online [KUO]. Undergraduates and onground graduate students are expected to spend at least two hours outside of class preparing for each hour in class. A 4-credit course requires these students to devote 120 hours of effort per term, or approximately three [3] hours of effort per week, for 10 weeks, for each registered credit hour. 

Kettering University Online [KUO] graduate courses, which may follow either a 6-week or 8-week schedule, require the same total amount of effort, i.e., 6-week courses require 20 hours of student work per week; 8-week courses require 15 hours per week, for a total effort of 120 hours. Kettering University Online [KUO] courses require a considerable amount of class time in the form of discussion board activities, synchronous webinars, or other online interactions, including individual interactions with professors. Preparation, research, viewing of media, and assignment completion require additional time. 

These credit hour requirements fulfill federal definitions and regulations regarding the assignment of credit hours as follows under Section 600.2 and 600.24(f) of the Higher Education Opportunity Act:

Credit hour: Except as provided in 34 CFR 668.8(k) and (l), a credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than --- 

1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out of class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or 

2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

Grade Changes

Grades (except incompletes) reported by an instructor are considered permanent and final. However, requests for a change of grade after an instructor reports final grade will be honored to correct an error in calculating or assigning that grade. To facilitate this process, the instructor will submit to the Registrar a grade change form, noting the rationale for the change, and what retroactive correction is to be made. This form must be countersigned by the instructor’s department head. Grade changes must be processed within one calendar year (12 months) form the last date of the term in which the course was taken. This includes incomplete grades that have been changed to a grade or have converted to a failing grade. Grade changes are not permitted after a degree has been awarded.

Grade Appeal Process

The course instructor has the authority and obligation to assign appropriate grades in any course. Questions concerning an assigned final grade are to be handled through the grade appeal process. Final course grades may be appealed only if the student can demonstrate that the grading policy applied to his/her grade does not conform to the stated grading policy of the course instructor. The absence of a grading policy will be considered reasonable grounds for appeal.  Appeals should be initiated as soon as possible but no later than 12 weeks after the grade has been posted. The student’s failure to access grades does not provide an exemption from the time limitation.

Grade Appeal Process

  1. Student - The student completes a Grade Appeal Form attaching any pertinent documentation to support his/her claim. 
  2. Instructor - Within two (2) weeks of the student’s request for a grade appeal, the course instructor accepts or denies the appeal.
  3. Department Head - Students who are not satisfied with the decision of the course instructor may appeal to the course instructor’s department head within 30 days of the course instructor’s response. Students appealing to the department head assume the burden of proof.  The appeal must include:  a statement of the reason the student is appealing the grade, evidence to support the appeal, the steps taken to resolve the disagreement over the assigned course grade and the resolution sought.  The department head will serve as a mediator between the student and the course instructor but cannot change a grade. The department head must respond in writing to the student, course instructor, and dean within 30 days of receipt of the appeal with the result of mediated discussion between the student and course instructor.
  4. Dean - Students who are not satisfied with the result of the discussions between the student and course instructor, mediated by the department head (step 3 above), may submit an appeal to the college dean (or graduate dean in the case of a graduate student). The student must forward all documents submitted in steps 1-3 above to the college dean (or graduate dean in the case of a graduate student).  If the dean concludes that the facts alleged by the student do not constitute grounds for appeal, the dean may dismiss the review.  The student will not be allowed any further appeal. If the dean determines that the facts alleged by the student are true, the dean shall refer the appeal to the Final Appeal Board.
  5. Final Appeal Board – The Associate Provost (or designee) will convene an appeal board comprised of the following members:  one tenured faculty member from the course instructor’s department, chosen by the course instructor; one tenured faculty member from the course instructor’s department, chosen by the Department Head; one tenured faculty member from outside the course instructor’s department, chosen by the Chair of the Promotion, Tenure and Ethics (PTE) Committee; and the Associate Provost (or designee), who does not vote, but chairs the board and handles all administrative matters.
  6. Provost - The Final Appeal Board makes a recommendation to the Provost to change the grade to a “P” for passing or keep the course instructor’s original grade.  The Associate Provost will provide a written overview of the Appeal Board’s decision to all involved parties.  The decision of the Provost represents a final University decision.

Questions:  Contact the Office of the Registrar

Graduation Requirements

Students must apply to graduate to begin the graduation process.  The time-frame to submit this application is when registering for your last term of courses.  

In order for a graduate degree to be awarded and verified by the Office of the Registrar, the following requirements must be satisfied:

  • Successfully complete all prescribed courses within the six (6) year limit. A student who anticipates not meeting the time limit must notify the Graduate Office at least six (6) months prior to the expiration of the six (6) year limit.
  • Achieve a final cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher.

Financial Obligations

Diplomas and transcripts are withheld until the student has satisfied all financial obligations with the University.

Final Degree Verification Letter

A final letter is sent to the student when all requirements for graduation are met. Final letters will not be issued until all grades for the graduating term are submitted and posted to the student’s record.

Degree Completion for Inactive Students with Coursework Remaining

Inactive students who wish to return to Kettering University must contact the Registrar’s Office for assistance. After ensuring there are no outstanding financial obligations to the university, the Registrar will refer such students to the appropriate Academic Department Head or Discipline Chair to develop a plan of study. The final plan will be filed in the departmental office and in the student’s permanent file in the Registrar’s Office. These students will be subject to meeting the requirements for degrees in effect at the time of readmission.

Commencement

Commencement is the formal ceremony which recognizes and celebrates graduates and graduation candidates. At Kettering University, commencement is held annually at the conclusion of the spring term. Refer to the published academic calendar for the date of commencement. Detailed information including eligibility requirements is available on the Office of the Registrar website.

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Incomplete Grades

For On Campus Programs

The grade of ‘I’ (Incomplete) may be issued by an instructor for any course in which the instructor deems that the work has not been completed and that it would be fair and equitable to allow the student additional time to complete the work. The conditions and terms for completion of the course are mutually agreed upon by the instructor and the student. The deadline for completion is at the discretion of the instructor but is not to exceed six months from the last day of the term in which the student was registered for the course. If a final grade is not submitted within six months, the incomplete grade converts to an ‘F’ (Fail) on the student’s record and will be reflected in the students’ GPA. The grade of ‘F’ will be considered a permanent grade.

The incomplete grade may be extended by the instructor for up to an additional six months, or one calendar year from the end of the term in which the student was registered for the course. To initiate an extension, the instructor will notify the Office of the Registrar in writing. The instructor is under no obligation to grant an extension. If a final grade is not submitted within the six month extension period, the incomplete grade converts to an ‘F’ (Fail) on the student’s record and will be reflected in the students’ GPA. The grade of ‘F’ will be considered a permanent grade.

A written agreement must be developed between the instructor and the student to clarify a plan for completion of the course. The student initiates this agreement by completing an Incomplete Grade Agreement Form after the incomplete grade has been issued by the instructor. The form will be filed in the Office of the Registrar as official documentation of the agreement.

Students should note that an incomplete grade does not yet reflect credit in the course. This means if a course with an incomplete grade is a prerequisite for another course, they may not register for the other course until the incomplete grade has been changed to reflect a passing grade. Prerequisite overrides are granted at the discretion of the department head for the course.

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Independent/Directed Study

In order to increase the scope and flexibility of course offerings, many departments offer courses under the designation of Independent or Directed Study. A student who desires a course not normally offered or not available during a given term should approach the instructor in whose discipline the course would normally fall to discuss the possibility of an Independent or Directed Study. If the instructor agrees, a written proposal may be required from the student, specifying the reading and/or research to be undertaken, reports or rests to be used for grading purposes, number of meetings per week, number of credits to be awarded, etc.

Independent Study

An independent study is a unique topic in a specific area of study not offered in an existing course. Requirements and meeting times are arranged by the instructor and student. A student must request and receive approval for an independent study through the instructional department. This is done by completing an Independent/Directed Study Form stating the independent study name and description, and obtaining all required signatures. The completed form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar no later than the last day of the drop/add period specified on the published academic calendar.

Directed Study

A directed study is a course listed in the catalog but not scheduled during a given term. It is done on a one-on-one basis with an instructor for that course. A student must request and receive approval for a directed study through the instructional department. This is done by completing an Independent/Directed Study Form stating the course number and obtaining all required signatures. The completed form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar no later than the last day of the drop/add period specified on the published academic calendar.

Questions: Contact the department offering the course
 

Graduate Program Extension Policy

Overly long times-to-degree are costly to both students and the University, for a variety of reasons.  Indeed, timely progress is a sign of intellectual vigor, competence and commitment.  Therefore, students have up to six years to complete all requirements for the Master’s degree at Kettering University.  If a student cannot complete the degree within the six-year time limit, they must request an extension.  To be considered eligible for a time extension, the student must 1) demonstrate satisfactory progress towards the completion of the degree and 2) receive endorsement or approval from the Graduate Program Advisor and/or the Department Head.  

Items that must be addressed on the Time Extension Request include:

  1. The reasons for the request.
  2. An explanation of how the student’s circumstances have changed to enable them to complete the degree now.
  3. An agreed upon plan and timeline for completion of the degree.

If approved, the student must complete the program requirements as outlined on the approved Program Time Extension form.  During the extension, the student must meet with the Program Director periodically to ensure that adequate progress towards degree completion is being maintained.

Appeal Process

If the Graduate Program Advisor and/or Department Head will not approve a request for extension, the student may appeal to the Graduate School.   In such cases, the Graduate Dean will confer with the Graduate Council to examine the extension request.  If the Graduate School is not able to approve the request, the student may make a final appeal to the Provost.

Questions: Contact the Graduate School at gsr@kettering.edu

Readmission to Kettering University

Students who were academically eligible to continue when they became inactive or withdrew may request readmission by contacting the Office of the Registrar.

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Registration

Registration is the process by which a student enrolls in a specific course(s) during a specific term. Registration for courses occurs after the application/admission process is complete and the student has been granted admission. Students cannot receive credit for a course for which they have not registered. Students must register for courses every term they wish to take classes.

Course Selection

Selection of courses is each student’s own responsibility. The student is personally responsible for being aware of prerequisite coursework and choosing program courses accordingly. To assist with your planning, program curricula is available online or in this catalog for each Kettering graduate program. Since many of our degree programs are designed for people who have full-time jobs, a normal term course load is one or two courses. Kettering University advises against heavier loads except for resident students who are not employed. The responsibility for deciding how many courses to take in a term is solely the student’s.

Registration: On Campus Graduate Students

Students must register online via Banner Web. Registration instructions can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

Students registered for courses will receive an e-mail notification to their Kettering e-mail account with instructions on how to log into Banner Web to retrieve their official invoice.  This invoice will confirm enrollment and denote the required tuition.  Detailed payment information will be in the email and on the invoice.  Payments can be made online or by mail.

Undergraduates Taking Graduate Courses

Students taking 500+ level courses are not automatically admissible to the graduate program. They still have to meet all published admissions requirements.  Note:  Courses taken for undergraduate credit at Kettering University may not be repeated at the graduate level and count towards the graduate program.  Furthermore, 500-level courses taken at Kettering University for undergraduate credit may not count as graduate credit except as approved per the BS/MS and BS/MBA policy guidelines.

Undergraduates Taking Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit

Students enrolled in an undergraduate degree program at Kettering University may request registration in a Kettering graduate level course (above 500-level) for undergraduate credit.  To do this, students must: 

Undergraduates Taking Graduate Courses for Graduate Credit

Students enrolled in an undergraduate program at Kettering University may request registration in a Kettering graduate level course (500 or above level) for graduate credit. Undergraduate students may take up to three graduate courses for graduate credit while an undergraduate student (no more than two per term). 

Students are eligible if they meet all of the following criteria:

  • They are enrolled in an undergraduate program at Kettering University
  • They are in good academic standing
  • They have a minimum of 120 earned credits
  • They are enrolled in no more than 20 credits, unless qualified to take 24 credits.

In order to receive graduate level credit, students do the following:

Questions:  Contact the Office of the Registrar

Repeating a Course

A student who receives a failing grade must retake the course if it is required for their program. Both grades will appear on the transcript but only the second grade is used in the computation of the cumulative grade point average. A student may repeat a course only once to improve his/her cumulative grade point average.

Courses taken for undergraduate credit at Kettering University may not be repeated at the graduate level and count towards the graduate program. Furthermore, 500-level courses taken at Kettering University for undergraduate credit may not count as graduate credit except as approved per the Bachelor/Master policy guidelines.

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

Student Grievance Procedures

A grievance is a written or verbal expression of dissatisfaction or formal allegation against the university, its units, its employees (including faculty and staff), and/or its students.

Harassment and Discrimination

For grievances related to harassment or discrimination in the learning or work environment, refer to the Student Life section of the undergraduate catalog, under Student Conduct, below.

Other Grievances

Currently enrolled students who have a grievance or issue should first try to work out the issue informally by discussing it in an honest and constructive manner with those persons most involved.  Many grievances can be resolved when a student makes an effort to honestly communication his/her frustrations or concerns.  If a student has a grievance related to a specific course he or she is enrolled in, he/she should first consult with the instructor of the course.  If necessary, the student or instructor may consult with the academic department head responsible for the course for guidance on how to best resolve the student’s concern.

For any grievances that the student cannot resolve informally with the parties involved, the student should contact either the Dean of Students (for non-academic-related issues) or the Associate Provost for Assessment & Academic Support (for academic-related issues).

Student Conduct

Ethics in the University

The mission of Kettering University rests on the premise of intellectual honesty; in the classroom, the laboratory, the office, and at the examination desk.  The very search for knowledge is impaired without a prevailing ethic of honor and integrity in all scholarly, professional, and personal activities.  The principles of honor and integrity make it possible for society to place trust in the degrees we confer, the research we produce, the scholarship we present and disseminate, and the critical assessments we make of the performance of students.  In order to achieve our goals of preserving, disseminating, and advancing knowledge, Kettering University expects all members of the community to be open to new ideas, to be governed by truthfulness, and to be considerate of the rights of others.  We strive to foster these values in all our endeavors and will employ all possible means to discourage dishonest behavior in any form.  We hold students accountable for their choices and actions through the Code of Student Conduct, administered by the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students. 

Academic Integrity

We believe fairness, openness, and intellectual honesty to be the keystones of our educational mission.  We foster these qualities in all our endeavors and use all possible means to discourage dishonesty, in any form.  All members of the Kettering community should report academic dishonesty to the appropriate faculty person, as well as to the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students.  Academic dishonesty prohibited at Kettering includes, but is not limited to, the following forms:

  • Cheating
    Intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise.
  • Fabrication
    Intentional and/or unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. 
  • Facilitating Academic Dishonesty
    Intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to engage in academic dishonesty in any form.
  • Plagiarism
    Intentionally or knowingly representing the words, ideas, or images of another as one’s own in any academic exercise.

Students found to have carried out any form of academic dishonesty are subject to the faculty member’s scrutiny and sanctions, as well as the University's policies and procedures.

Kettering Code of Student Conduct

The Kettering University Code of Student Conduct represents a body of behavioral standards for all students.  These standards are strictly and vigorously enforced by Kettering University to ensure members of this educational community a productive, safe, and equitable environment for growth and development.  Kettering University students are expected to conduct themselves as mature individuals while on campus, at home, and in their work-section communities.

Students are expected to comply with all University regulations governing student conduct and the use of University property and facilities.  Kettering University has the right to take action and investigate any offense that involves our students, either as victims reporting or students accused of violating the Code of Student Conduct or any federal, state, and/or local laws/ordinances.  The Code of Student Conduct extends to students at their places of co-op employment.  We expect students to honor their co-op employer’s standards for workplace demeanor and may impose our Judicial Affairs procedures upon any student charged by an employer with workplace misconduct.

Code of Student Conduct

Conduct for which students may be subject to judicial action falls into, but is not limited to, the following categories:

  • Endangering people or their property.
  • Obstructing the normal functions of Kettering University or a co-op employer.
  • Theft or damage to property, including intellectual property, of Kettering University, a co-op employer, or any individual.
  • Any willful damage to the reputation or psychological well-being of others.
  • Threatening, intimidating, harassing, coercing, or verbally abusing another.
  • Any physical violence directed at any member of the Kettering University community or a co-op employer’s.
  • Unauthorized entry to, use of, or occupancy of Kettering University facilities or a co-op employer’s.
  • Any dishonesty, cheating, forgery, plagiarism, or alteration of, or misuse of Kettering University documents, records or identification, or a co-op employer’s.
  • Computer misuse, while on academic or work term, at the University or at co-op employment, including but not limited to:
    • Theft or other abuse of computer operations.
    • Unauthorized entry into a file to use, read, or change the contents, or for any other purpose.
    • Unauthorized transfer of a file or files.
    • Unauthorized use of another individual’s identification and/or password.
    • Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty member, or university official.
    • Use of computing facilities to send obscene or abusive messages.
    • Use of computing facilities to interfere with the normal operation of the University’s or a co-op employer’s computer system.
  • Violation of applicable public laws while on Kettering University owned property, University or student-sponsored or supervised functions, a co-op employer’s owned or controlled property, or at a co-op employer-sponsored or supervised function. 
  • Possession or use on campus or at a place of co-op employment of firearms, explosives, explosive fuels, dangerous chemicals or other dangerous weapons, except as specifically authorized by Kettering University or a co-op employer.
  • Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics or controlled substances except as expressly permitted by law.
  • Possession or use of alcohol on Kettering’s campus; any underage possession or use of alcohol. 
  • Failure to comply with directions of Kettering University or co-op employer officials acting in performance of their duties.
  • Conduct which adversely affects the student’s suitability as a member of the Kettering University and/or co-op employment communities.

Student Rights and Responsibilities Provided by Kettering University

Any student accused of any violation of Kettering University’s Code of Student Conduct will be extended the following rights and responsibilities:

  • Formal, written notification of all charges to be heard at either an Administrative Hearing or a University Board of Student Conduct.   
  • Right to a timely hearing.  The University has the right to establish deadlines for hearing a case, as well as hear a case in a student’s absence should s/he fail to appear at the established time and place. 
  • Opportunity to review the misconduct file which will be presented at an Administrative Hearing or University Board of Student Conduct. 
  • Time to prepare a defense.  Students will receive at least 48 hours’ notice of the time and place of an Administrative Hearing or University Board of Student Conduct.
  • Right to be present at an Administrative Hearing or University Board of Student Conduct.
  • Right to have an adviser present at an Administrative Hearing or University Board of Student Conduct. The adviser must be a member of the Kettering University community and may advise the accused student, but may not conduct the student’s defense.
  • Right to ask questions of any witnesses who appear at an Administrative Hearing or University Board of Student Conduct.
  • Right to present defense witnesses whose presences has been requested, in writing, at least 48 hours prior to an Administrative Hearing or University Board of Student Conduct.
  • All hearings will be closed.  Hearing results will be held in confidence, except that the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students may determine that other Kettering University officials ought to be aware of the results and will inform them.
  • Crime victims will be notified of hearing results, in accordance with existing federal, state, and local laws.

Kettering University has the right to request a student return to campus during a work- or off-term in order to expedite a case perceived as serious and pressing in nature. Students are entitled to the rights afforded by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

Resolution Options

Administrative Hearing

In cases where charges do not appear to merit suspension or expulsion, or in cases which the accused does not contest the charges, the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students may designate an Administrative Hearing Officer (AHO), usually the Associate Dean of Students.  The AHO will investigate the case and conduct a hearing with the accused.  Administrative Hearings accommodate all those rights and procedures accorded to students by the University’s misconduct policies.  Following the hearing, the AHO will provide the student with written notification of the results of the hearing, as well as information about the appeals process. 

University Board of Student Conduct

The Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students designates a University Board of Student Conduct (UBSC) whenever charges may result in suspension or expulsion, including all cases involving academic misconduct.  In these cases, the Associate Dean of Students chairs the UBSC, comprised of a minimum of three members of the Kettering community and including representatives from faculty, staff, and students.  The Associate Dean of Students investigates the charges and prepares the case for presentation to the UBSC.  All presentations include resolution options.  The UBSC makes recommendations to the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students, who may endorse, alter, or dismiss them. 

Other Resolution Options

The Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students may, after consultation with the involved parties, provide other avenues of resolution, including mediation and/or conciliation.

Administrative and University Board of Student Conduct Hearings Decisions

All decisions will be based only on documents, testimony, and evidence presented at administrative and judicial board hearings.

Sanctions

The University has the right to enforce a variety of sanctions upon students who are found to have violated the Code of Student Conduct.  They include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Creation of a Misconduct File
    The University applies this sanction whenever a designated hearing officer upholds charges against a student for violating the Kettering Code of Student Conduct, yet it appears that interviews and counseling associated with the pre-hearing and hearing are sufficient to deter further violation.  The Associate Dean of Students creates an official file detailing the student’s offense.
  • Misconduct Warning
    A Misconduct Warning consists of a formal, written notice that the student has violated the Code of Student Conduct and that any future violation will result in more serious consequences.
  • Restitution and/or Fines
    When a violation of the Code of Student Conduct results in costs to other students, Kettering University, or others, a student may be required to make restitution and/or pay a fine.  The University applies fines to community endeavors.
  • Community Service
    This sanction requires students to contribute a fixed number of hours, without compensation, to benefit the University or the local community.  The University retains the right to require that students complete community service with particular organizations it specifies. 
  • Misconduct Probation
    Misconduct probation implies a medial status between good standing at Kettering, and suspension or expulsion.  A student on Misconduct Probation will be permitted to remain enrolled at Kettering University under certain stated situational conditions, depending on the nature of the violation and the potential learning value that may be derived from such conditions.  Usually, Misconduct Probation extends over a stated period, during which it is clearly understood that the student is subject to further disciplinary action, including suspension or expulsion, if the student violates the terms of probation or in any way fails to conduct him/herself as a responsible member of the Kettering University community.  Misconduct Probation serves as a final warning to the student to re-evaluate and modify his/her unacceptable behavior.  Students on Misconduct Probation will not be allowed to represent the University in any formal manner and may not serve in a student leadership position during the period of probation.  Knowledge of a student’s Misconduct Probation status may be made known to others at the University on a need-to-know basis.
  • Interim Suspension and/or Altered Privileges
    Kettering imposes interim suspension when it appears the accused poses a threat to him/herself or others at the University.  It may also be imposed following allegations of sexual or physical assault, drug use and/or distribution, threats of violence, etc.
    The Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students or designate may alter or suspend the privileges/rights of a student to be present on campus and/or to attend classes for an interim period prior to the resolution of a misconduct proceeding.  Decisions of this sort will be based upon whether the allegation of misconduct appears reliable and whether the student’s continued presence reasonably poses a threat to the physical or emotional condition and/or well-being of any individual, including the accused student’s.  Interim suspension may also be imposed when the accused student’s continued presence appears to disrupt the University’s regular or special functions, or threatens the safety or welfare of university property.
    Interim suspension and/or altered privileges remain in effect until a final decision is made on a pending incident.  The Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students or designate may repeal interim suspension or altered privileges at his/her discretion.
  • Suspension
    Suspension—an involuntary separation of a student from Kettering University—implies and states a time for return to the university.  Suspension may extend for a school and/or work term, for a specified period, until a specified date, or until a stated condition is met.  A University Board of Conduct may recommend suspension, but only the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students may impose it.
  • Expulsion
    Expulsion—a permanent involuntary separation of a student from Kettering University—may be recommended by a University Board of Conduct, but only the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students may impose it. 
  • Notification of Sanction to Co-Op Employers
    The University has the right and responsibility to notify a student’s co-op employer whenever the student is found to have violated the Kettering Code of Student Conduct. 
  • Appeals

Any student who has been sanctioned through Kettering University Student Misconduct processes has the right to appeal to the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students.  All appeals must be made in writing within five [5] business days of notification of the results of a hearing and must state the grounds upon which the appeal is based.  Grounds for appeal might include claims of procedural errors, new information, denial of rights, or inappropriately severe punishment.  Should the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students choose to grant an appeal, the case will be reviewed and a written decision will be conveyed to the student indicating whether the sanction[s] shall stand, be modified, or reversed.

Students’ Use of Technology

The use of any personal computational or communications devices in the classroom, not otherwise governed by University or course policies, is subject to the approval of the instructor.  This includes, but is not limited to, the use of calculators, computers, personal digital assistants, text pagers, and cell phones.  Any use of such devices without the instructor’s approval is prohibited.  The use of such devices without permission of the instructor may be considered disruptive behavior.  Students who persist in such activity may be subject to the University’s “Dismissal Due to Disruptive Behavior” policy. 

The use of electronic devices to facilitate an act of academic misconduct, such as cheating or plagiarism, will be considered a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and adjudicated following standard student misconduct policies and procedures.

Students are expected to familiarize themselves with Kettering University’s Acceptable Use Policy, posted on the “Policies and Standards” section of the Information Technology website.

Dismissal from Class Due to Disruptive Behavior

Whenever an enrolled student’s presence or behavior in class disrupts the learning environment and, in the faculty member’s opinion, undermines the best interests of the class and/or the student, the faculty member may request in writing (with a copy to the appropriate Department Head) that the student be issued an administrative dismissal.  The faculty member should discuss the student’s behavior with the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students (VPSL) and/or her designate, who will meet with the faculty member to discuss the alleged incident.  The VPSL will also meet with the student to determine possible judicial action after determining whether or not the student’s behavior violated the Kettering Code of Student Conduct.  The VPSL will either appoint a judicial officer to adjudicate the matter or refer it for action by a University Board of Student Conduct. If the dismissal occurs by Friday of seventh week, student will receive a grade of W (withdrawal).  If the dismissal occurs after Friday of seventh week, student will receive a non-passing grade.

Productive Learning Environment

Kettering University expects all students, faculty, and staff to contribute to a productive learning environment by demonstrating behavior that neither interferes with another individual’s performance nor creates an intimidating, offensive, or hostile environment.  The University will not tolerate harassment or discrimination in any forms, regardless of intent and/or the victim’s reaction.

Harassment

The University prohibits all sexual harassment and/or offensive conduct, on campus and in students’ work section communities.  Such conduct includes, but is not limited to sexual flirtation, touching, verbal or physical advances or propositions, verbal abuse of a sexual nature,  graphic or suggestive comments about an individual’s dress or body, sexually degrading words to describe an individual, and/or the display of sexually suggestive objects or pictures, including nude photographs.  Behavior constitutes sexual harassment when it is unwelcome and it interferes with the ability of another person to carry out his/her responsibilities, creates a hostile learning or work environment, or its expression implies that acceptance of the behavior is a condition of course registration, course completion, course evaluation, or employment. 

If you believe the words or actions of a University employee or student on campus constitutes unwelcome harassment, take the following steps:

  • Inform him or her that his/her actions are unwelcome and the harassing behavior must cease.
  • Keep a written record of the details, including time, date, what was said, or what occurred.
  • Report the discrimination to the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students, the Director of Human Resources, other University officials, or via our Non-Academic Grievance Form, available in the Student Life Office, Academic Services, the Wellness Center, Thompson Hall, and online at the Student Life website [add URL]. 

If harassment occurs at your work site, you should report it to your supervisor or the appropriate person as directed by your employee handbook, as well as to your Cooperative Education Manager/Educator.  Enlist the counsel of a trusted adviser, if necessary, to report sexual harassment wherever and whenever it occurs.  The University pledges to investigate promptly all complaints of harassment and to pursue a timely resolution, which the appropriate University officials will communicate to the parties involved.  We will maintain confidentiality to the extent reasonably possible. 

Discrimination

Kettering University is committed to a policy of non-discrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race/ethnicity, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, marital status, height, weight, marital, military or disability status or any other basis protected by federal or state law.  Discrimination includes, but is not limited to the following:

  • Preventing any person from using University facilities or services because of that person’s race/ethnicity, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age,  height, weight, and/or marital, military, or disability status.
  • Making determinations regarding a person’s salary based on race/ethnicity, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, height, weight, and/or marital, military, or disability status.
  • Denying a person access to an educational program based on that person’s race/ethnicity, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, height, weight, and/or marital, military, or disability status.
  • Instigating or allowing an environment that is unwelcoming or hostile based on a person’s race/ethnicity, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, height, weight, and/or marital, military, or disability status.
  • Denying raises, benefits, promotions, leadership opportunities, or performance evaluations on the basis of a person’s race/ethnicity, color, ancestry, national origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, height, weight, and/or marital, military, or disability status.

If discrimination takes place at your work site, you should report it to your supervisor or the appropriate person as directed by your employee handbook, as well as to your Cooperative Education Manager/Educator.  Enlist the counsel of a trusted adviser, if necessary, to report discrimination wherever and whenever it occurs.  The University pledges to investigate promptly all complaints of discrimination and to pursue a timely resolution, which the appropriate University officials will communicate to the parties involved.  We will maintain confidentiality to the extent reasonably possible. 

If you believe the words or actions of a University employee or student constitutes discrimination, take the following steps:

  • Inform him or her that his/her actions are unwelcome and the discriminating behavior must cease.
  • Keep a written record of the details, including time, date, what was said, or what occurred.
  • Report the discrimination to the Vice President of Student Life & Dean of Students, the Director of Human Resources, other University officials, or via our Non-Academic Grievance Form, available in the Student Life Office, Academic Services, the Wellness Center, and Thompson Hall.

Student Complaint Procedures

A complaint is a written or verbal expression of dissatisfaction or formal allegation against the university, its units, its employees (including faculty and staff), and/or its students.

Harassment and Discrimination

For complaints related to harassment or discrimination in the learning or work environment, refer to the Student Life section of this catalog, under Student Conduct:  Behavioral Standards.

Other Complaints

Currently enrolled students who have a complaint or issue should first try to work out the problem informally by discussing it in an honest and constructive manner with those persons most involved with the issue. Many complaints can be resolved when a student makes an effort to honestly communicate his/her frustrations or concerns. If a student has a complaint related to a specific course he or she is enrolled in, he/she should first consult with the instructor of the course. If necessary, the student or instructor may consult with the academic department head responsible for the course for guidance on how to best resolve the student’s concern. 

For any complaints that the student cannot resolve informally with the parties involved, the student should contact either the Dean of Students (for non-academic-related issues) or the Associate Provost for Assessment and Academic Support (for academic-related issues). 

Questions:  Contact the Student Life Office for non-academic issues or the Office of the Provost for academic-related issues.

Electronic Communications

All students have the privilege of having a Kettering University Google Apps e-mail account.  The Kettering e-mail account is one of the official ways Kettering University faculty and staff communicate to students.  Students are responsible for required actions conveyed to them through this communication vehicle, whether or not they read the message.  Kettering provides each student with unlimited e-mail server storage.  Therefore, forwarding Kettering emails to another e-mail service provider is strongly discouraged, because that provider may have less storage capacity, fewer features, and may prevent students from replying directly to the original e-mail source.

Due to the proliferation of spam and phishing emails, students may receive e-mails that request personal information, such as usernames and passwords. Although it may look authentic, pretending to originate from a legitimate source such as Kettering, students are to delete such emails immediately without opening them, recognizing that a legitimate source, such as the Kettering IT department, would never ask students for their passwords. Students are asked to be cautious regarding any unsolicited e-mails as they may contain elements that could prove to be detrimental to personal computers. 

Questions:  Contact Information Technology   

Academic Terms

The Kettering University on-campus schedule operates on four 11-week terms per year.

Thesis

Thesis Option – MS in Engineering

A thesis option is available for designated graduate programs. The thesis is required for on-campus research programs in Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering.

Masters Thesis

Students must be participants in classes on campus during at least two of the terms in which they are working on the thesis. The degree department will specify which course(s) may be replaced by the thesis. Criteria for topic selection are up to the degree department, as are thesis-option prerequisites, if appropriate. Information about the administrative requirements for a Masters Thesis may be obtained from the Graduate School.

A thesis committee of at least three (3) faculty members is required. Students must obtain the written consent of the individuals who will serve on the committee, starting with the professor who will be the major advisor and chair of the committee. If a student is unable to find a professor to be the major advisor, then the student will not be able to elect the thesis option. Students are urged to form the advisory committee and gain approval of a written research proposal during their first year of graduate student and should begin work on the thesis project as soon as the proposal is approved. Registration for thesis credits requires the approval of the chair of the thesis committee. This approval is contingent upon prior approval of the research proposal by the thesis committee.

Master’s theses are theory-based and goal-oriented. The criteria for success are achievement of the research goal and production of a written thesis of publishable quality. 

Questions: Contact the program advisor

Transfer Credit

The maximum number of graduate credits for which a person may receive transfer credit is eight (8) credit hours. Credit is only considered for courses with a grade of B or better. All requests for transfer credit should be for graduate-level courses (taken for graduate credit) significantly similar to a specific course within the student’s program.

To apply for transfer credit, the student must complete the Application for Transfer Credit Form and submit an official transcript from an accredited institution, plus a course description and syllabus. There is a processing fee of $5.00 (U.S.) per credit hour for transfer credit (i.e., the processing fee to transfer in for a 4-credit course is $20.00).

Note: Programs through the Department of Business have additional transfer credit guidelines. Refer to the individual program sections of this catalog for more information.

Questions: Contact the Graduate School at gsr@kettering.edu for more information.

Withdrawals

Course Withdrawals

When circumstances occur whereby a student feels that completion of a course is not possible or in the student’s best interest, the student may request a non-punitive grade of W (Withdrawn) be issued by the Registrar’s Office. Such requests will be accepted and honored during the course withdrawal period specified on the published academic calendar. After the course withdrawal period, the student may not withdraw from the course and is committed to receiving a Kettering University letter grade. A student who wishes to withdraw from a course must submit a written request using the Graduate Program Course Withdrawal Form.  Refunds or reduction of tuition are made according to the published schedule in the graduate catalog.

University Withdrawal

Withdrawing from the University requires a written request to the Office of the Registrar at registrar@kettering.edu.

Withdrawal due to Active Duty

Students may withdraw from the University and receive a 100% tuition refund upon presenting to the Registrar, the original Armed Forces orders. Non-punitive grades of W will be issued. Should the call come during eighth week or later, in the judgment of the instructor and the student, a grade of Incomplete (I) may be given with no reimbursement of tuition. Course work then would be completed per arrangements agreed upon by the instructor and student.

Questions: Contact the Office of the Registrar

On-Campus Plan of Study for International students

International students will be able to utilize a summer term for internships, better aligning the graduate program with the University’s mission.  The on-campus programs operate on a calendar similar to a conventional quarter system: Fall, Winter, and Spring terms are “regular” academic terms during which students normally enroll full-time, and the Summer term is optional. 

Many variations of this plan are possible, both with or without thesis. In particular, students may begin the program in any term, not just Fall.  However, international students are required to complete two academic terms to be eligible for a non-study/internship term.  This works perfectly for students that start in Fall or Winter.  If an international student starts in Spring term, they will not be able to take an internship their first summer.  They may forego the non-study/internship term or apply to have their non-study/internship term changed to a regular academic term.  For an international student, only one non-study/internship term is allowed during the plan of study.

The non-study/internship term offers the opportunity for the student to work in an internship at a related industry, work on-campus, travel, or optionally register in further coursework.

Please refer to specific program information as you develop your plan of study.  Note that the CE and EE concentrations, in the MS Engineering program, require a masters thesis which is non-credit bearing.  However, in the other MS Engineering concentrations the masters thesis is optional and carries eight (8) credit hours. 

Note that eight (8) credit hours constitutes full time for financial aid, and visa requirements, however, students may elect to carry a higher course load. While some students prefer to take one class at a time, this may create issues with financial aid or visa status.

Students enrolling in the on-campus MBA,  MS in Engineering Management, or MS in Operations Management, may have prerequisite courses that will lengthen the plan of study.

Example Plan of Study without Thesis:

Classification Code Earned Hours
First Year Fall 8 credits coursework
Winter 8 credits coursework
Spring 8 credits coursework
Summer Non-Study / Internship term
Second Year Fall 8 credits coursework
Winter 8 credits coursework
Example Plan of Study with Thesis:
Classification Code Earned Hours
First Year Fall 8 credits coursework
Winter 8 credits coursework
Spring 8 credits coursework
Summer Non-Study / Internship term
Second Year Fall 8 credits coursework
Winter 8 credits coursework + thesis 1
Spring Thesis defense and submission

Example Plan of Study without Thesis, taking summer classes.

Classification Code Earned Hours
First Year Fall 8 credits coursework
Winter 8 credits coursework
Spring 8 credits coursework
Summer 8 credits coursework
Second Year Fall 8 credits coursework

Leave of Absence

The Graduate Student Leave of Absence (LOA) Policy assists and encourages students to return and complete their degree after up to two consecutive terms of absence from Kettering University.  Eligible students are encouraged to take advantage of the benefits provided by an LOA, e.g., no need to apply for readmission and ability to participate in their regularly scheduled registration/enrollment period upon return to the University.  Refer to the Leave of Absence Request Form for more information and instructions.   

Questions:  Contact the Office of the Registrar