Indust/Manufctrng Engrg (IME)

IME-563  Safety and Human Factors    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Minimum Class Standing: Senior
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Discussion of the relationship between traditional safety engineering and human factors or ergonomics. Examination of man-machine interfaces relative to people’s capabilities and limitations. Application of accident modeling or investigation and hazard analysis or control techniques. Introduction to mandatory and voluntary specification and performance regulations, standards, and guidelines.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

IME-564  Ethics and Practice of Engineering    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Minimum Class Standing: Senior
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
The professional and ethical consideration of an engineer in contemporary society is covered in this course. Discussions include the code of ethics for engineers, case studies on conflict of interest, team, engineering/management responsibilities, environmental considerations and professional registration. This class requires live weekly discussion.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-572  Introduction to Reliability and Maintainability    4 Credits

Prerequisites: MATH-408
Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Basic knowledge and skills of reliability techniques that can be used by practicing engineers is provided in this course. The primary emphasis is on the problem of quantifying reliability in product design and testing. The topics include reliability definition and concepts, life testing and data analysis, system reliability models, and repairable systems reliability. Accelerated life testing will also be discussed.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

IME-573  Advanced Quality Assurance    4 Credits

Prerequisites: IME-333 and IME-471
Minimum Class Standing: Senior
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
The advanced topics of modern methods of quality control and improvement that are used in the manufacturing and service industries are covered in this course. It includes statistical methods of quality improvement, concept of variation and its reduction, statistical process control, designed experiments in quality improvement, and quality in the service sector. Taguchi and Deming’s quality concepts will also be discussed.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-575  Failure Analysis    4 Credits

Prerequisites: IME-301
Minimum Class Standing: Senior
Terms Offered: Summer, Fall
An engineering materials analysis course emphasizing the interaction of materials and processing as they relate to product failure. Topic coverage includes fracture path analysis, fracture mode, brittle and ductile behavior, fracture mechanics, corrosion, and material process analysis. This course requires a laboratory analysis project.
Lecture: 2, Lab 2, Other 0

IME-598  IME-Study Abroad    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Advanced Topics in the Industrial Manufacuring Engineering. This is a transfer course taken a part of Kettering's Study Abroad Program.
Lecture: 4, Lab 0, Other 0

IME-601  Fundamentals of Manufacturing Engineering    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
A general overview of the field of Manufacturing Engineering is provided in this course. Topics introduced include: various manufacturing processes, materials, quality assurance, quality control, safety, ISO/QS 9000, process and facilities planning, project management, and lean manufacturing. This course is delivered entirely via the internet.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-603  Numerical Control Machining    4 Credits

Prerequisites: IME-301
The fundamentals of computer numerical control (CNC) programming and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) are introduced in this course. The fundamental theoretical and operational concepts of machining are also presented. The course focuses on the programming of cutting operations; tool materials, selection, and uses. Significant topics include: G-code programming, Introduction to CAM software, Taylor’s tool life model, Criteria for tool selection, and the Orthogonal Cutting Model. Laboratories use CNC machine tools for programming and cutting, and are designed to illustrate theoretical concepts and methods for solving practical engineering machining problems.
Lecture: 3, Lab 2, Other 0

IME-652  Designing Value in the Supply Chain    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
Students gain an understanding of the decision-making tools necessary to design value in the global supply chain from concept to customer. Quantitative methods are employed to aid the decision-making process of demand forecasting and enterprise planning for the purpose of increased profit and value to stakeholders. Basic concepts in strategy, forecasting, demand planning, inventory control and value stream mapping will be taught and utilized to enable the decision-making process to be based on quantitative metrics.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-654  Enterprise Resource Planning    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
An understanding of the integrated approach to enterprise planning and its evolution from MRP I and MRP II is provided in this course. It describes the core structure of ERP systems and highlights the characteristics of emerging ERP based organizations. Various ERP tools and techniques are described and compared. The fundamental success factors in moving from traditional business functions to an integrated process-based ERP environment are introduced.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-656  Engineering for Healthcare Systems    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
This course examines the technical structure of the healthcare delivery system and the role that industrial and systems engineering (ISE) plays in its design and improvement. Included will be how healthcare systems work in hospitals, medical offices, clinics and other healthcare organizations. Traditional ISE methods for improving quality, patient safety, and employee productivity and satisfaction will be presented within a systematic application of value chain engineering designed to produce lean processes.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-660  Design for Manufacture and Assembly    4 Credits

Prerequisites: IME-601
A study of the current methodologies associated with product design for manufacture and assembly. Topics include DFMA overview, Design for Function, Design for Assembly Principles, BDI-DFA Manual Methodology, Creative Concept Development, and Concept Selection Methodologies. Note: Students who have taken IME-474, Design for Manufacture or its equivalent are not eligible to enroll in this course but must substitute another engineering course approved by their faculty advisors.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-674  Quality Assurance and Reliability    4 Credits

Prerequisites: (IME-605 or MATH-605)
The topics in quality assurance are covered in this course. Specifically, it includes introduction to quality and quality philosophy, statistical methods of quality improvement, concept of variation and its reduction, statistical process control, and acceptance sampling. Statistical software such as MINITAB is used throughout the course. Terms Offered: At least once on a live/tape basis and the rest via tape-delay basis. This is out of necessity and flexibility expected of the master’s program.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-676  Lean Six Sigma    4 Credits

Prerequisites: None
This techniques to maximize production efficiency and to maintain control over each step in the process are examined in this course. The structured problem-solving methodology DMAIC (Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control) will provide the framework for the course.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1

IME-680  Computer Integrated Manufacturing    4 Credits

Prerequisites: IME-601
CIM is defined with current terminology and recent concepts. It includes the relationships among the three major functions - design, manufacturing and business. CIM examples, obstacles to development and future trends are covered. Flexible manufacturing is highlighted. Key components of CIM are explored with special emphasis on robotic automation and control through interaction with the environment, CAD-CAM link with numerical control, computer supervisory control, process planning and quality assurance. Concurrent Engineering will be used in process and product quality selection. Lean manufacturing principles will be applied. Communication and networking, the artery of CIM, will be studied in the context of data compatibility and hierarchical control. Manufacturing analysis tools will be used to plan and implement a CIM system.
Lecture: 3, Lab 0, Other 1